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Postcolonial Studies Salon

Date: 23 Nov 2016 & 25 Nov 2016 (Wed & Fri)

Time: 09:00-11:30 (21 st) & 15:00-17:30 (23rd)

Venue: B3-LP-05

Students of ENG4349 Postcolonial Literatures in English present their final projects.

Public lecture “Varieties of the English” by Tse Hao Guang

Date: 17 Nov 2016 (Thursday)

Time: 14:30-16:30

Venue: D1-LP-08, EdUHK

Speaker: Tse Hao Guang, Singapore-based poet 

Abstract

In this talk Singaporean poet Tse Hao Guang will look at poetry, including his own which comments on postcolonial and postmodern turns in Singapore culture. He will consider the ways in which Singaporean writers try to employ conversational/natural voices to counter the perception that poetry is elitist. Drawing on Singaporean writing in traditional and nonce forms, particularly writing that makes use of creole and pidgin, Tse will argue that there are ways to productively engage in linguistic experimentation, reclaim a colonial tool, and resist the neocolonial urge to consider such Englishes low prestige, all at once.

Bio
Assembled with parts from Hong Kong and Malaysia, Tse Hao Guang 謝皓光 is the author of hyperlinkage (2013) and Deeds of Light (2015, both Math Paper Press). Deeds was shortlisted for the Singapore Literature Prize in 2016. He co-edits the cross-genre, collaborative journal OF ZOOS, and UnFree Verse (2017), the in-progress anthology of Singapore poetry in received and nonce forms. He serves as essays editor of the online educational/critical resource poetry.sg, and is a 2016 fellow of the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa.

 

 

No registration is required. For enquiries, please contact Mr. Manni CHEUNG: (E) cheungml@eduhk.hk, (T) 2948-7360.

 

We look forward to seeing you in the lecture.

 

 

Film Screening: exodus of nowhere, episode 2: gamble (selected excerpt)

Screening & Discussion: exodus of nowhere, episode 2: gamble

Co-created by Lee Wai Yi, Enoch Ng, and Kelvin Wu, 2014. A v-artivist film.

Date: 21 Nov 2016 (Mon)

Time: 19:30-21:30

Venue: C-LP-02

Language: (Screening) Cantonese, English and Putonghua, with Chinese and English subtitles; (Discussion) Cantonese, with simultaneous interpretation in English

 

exodus of no where is a film series concerning the relationships between the grassroots and the borders. The three filmmakers attempt to understand in what way does the narrative network constituted by migration, border-crossing, wealth disparity, colonization, gender politics, capitalistic globalization and ethnic politics creates countless tragedies of the grassroots, through looking into small family histories and grand narration of human migration.

 

Biography

v-artivist, a Hong Kong community based art group, believes that ‘art is the creative expression of the relationship between individual and collective’, and is thus devoted to “give art back to the people and let people return to art”. most of v-artivist film-length “productions”, which concerns the livelihood of the grassroots, are continuous participatory documentaries that involves co-creation with people who are “being filmed”, including people in deep distress (2013), raging land film series (2010-), walk on! shung ning road (2011), and home where the yellow banners fly (2006). the essay-film trilogy exodus of nowhere is their response to the growing ethnic tension in contemporary Hong Kong. other than filmmaking, v-artivist is also actively engaged in media literary movement to empower the grassroots’ continuous and autonomous engagement with art.

〔未存在的故鄉〕是影行者所製作、一系列有關基層與邊境的影片。〔未存在的故鄉〕的三人,嘗試透過自身和家族的歴史,對照各種小人物跨越邊境的歴史,了解移民、邊境、貧富懸殊、殖民、資本全球化與族群政治之間千絲萬縷的故事網絡,如何導致歷史上大大小小的悲劇。

在越趨非此即彼,越來越喜歡為人貼標籤、迫人站邊以示正義的時代裡,我們可以選擇既有原則,但也有思考、了解、溝通、反思嗎?我們可以選擇,做一個人嗎?

誠邀各位有興趣的朋友來參與放映及映後討論,到時見。

共同創作:李維怡、胡家偉、吳以諾|製作:影行者|廣東話、英語、普通話(中、英文字幕)|2014|香港|140分鐘

 

 

Public Lecture: “Poeticizing The Archives” by poet and essayist Lawrence Ypil (20 Oct 2016)

The Centre for Popular Culture in the Humanities cordially invites you to attend a public lecture “Poeticizing The Archives” by poet and essayist, Lawrence L. Ypil. Details of the talk are as follows:

Date: 20 October 2016 (Thursday)

Time: 15:30 – 17:00

Venue: D2-LP-05, Tai Po Campus

Lecture Abstract

For the past few years, poet and essayist Lawrence Lacambra Ypil has been writing about early twentieth century photography. In this talk, he shares his experience of working on his ongoing project entitled “There.” Through a series of lyric essays, he ruminates on postcolonial photography and Southeast Asian urbanity.

In the project, he explores the role of photography in cultural memory, but also the specific challenges faced by the creative writer when confronting the historical archives. What forms of knowledge are revealed, perhaps even revelled in, when one chooses to write poems about history? In what way do hybrid forms, forms which transgress borders between poetry and prose, text and image, permit ways of speaking and singing that allow us a renewed sense of history?

About the Speaker

Lawrence Lacambra Ypil is a poet and essayist from Cebu, Philippines. He received an MFA in Nonfiction Writing from the University of Iowa and an MFA in Poetry from Washington University in St Louis on a Fulbright Scholarship. His first book of poems, The Highest Hiding Place (2009) was given the Madrigal Gonzalez Best First Book Award and his work has received numerous awards including The Academy of American Poets Prize, the Philippines Free Press Awards, and the Don Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards. He is currently writing a book on ethnography, early twentieth century photography and the role of material culture in the construction of cultural identity. His work also straddles the borders between poetry and prose, text and image. He teaches writing at Yale-NUS College in Singapore.

For enquiries, please contact Mr. Manni CHEUNG: (E) cheungml@eduhk.hk, (T) 2948-7360.

 

Guest Seminar: “The Interim is Mine”: Ambition and Opportunity in Shakespeare’s Hamlet and Feng Xiaogang’s The Banquet (2006)

Date: 13 Sept 2016 (Tuesday)

Time: 15:30-17:30

Venue: D2-LP-09, EdUHK

Speaker: Robin S. Stewart, School of Humanities University of California, Irvine

Since its release in 2006, critical discussions of Feng Xiaogang’s The Banquet have often focused on Feng’s ambition to make a film that would be as successful internationally as his New Year’s films had been in the domestic Chinese market previously. According to this narrative, Feng’s decision to adapt Hamlet was a calculated attempt to leverage Shakespeare’s cultural capital in order to win over Western audiences. While such a cynical reading of Feng’s motives is undoubtedly correct on the surface (as the director’s own word in interviews have indicated), this talk suggests that Hamlet – with its themes of ambition, opportunity, and generational conflict – offered Feng a set of deep thematic resonances to reflect upon his own position within the changing dynamics of Chinese cinema, allowing him to explore his own personal ambitions and ambivalences as well as his ambitions for the Chinese film industry as a whole.

For enquiries, please contact Mr. Manni Cheung via cheungml@eduhk.hk

 

Behind Concrete Walls: Images of Migrant Women, Anxiety, Hope and Empowerment

Exhibition: 18-21 April 2016 (All Day)

Forum: 21 April 2016 (13:00-14:00). Speaker: Ms. Cynthia Ca Tellez, General Manager, MFMW

B4-G/F, HKIEd

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In cooperation with Mission for Migrant Workers(MFMW), Bethune House and HER Fund, The Centre for Popular Culture in the Humanities is organised a photo exhibition entitled “Behind Concrete Walls: Images on Migrant Women, Anxiety, Hope and Empowerment” featuring works by the photographer Ms. Xyza Cruz Bacani, whose inspiring story was widely reported by mainstream media.

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About Xyza Cruz Bacani:

Xyza Cruz Bacani was born in the Philippines. In her young age, she came to Hong Kong as a domestic helper to support her family. With the support of her employer, she started taking street and documentary photographers in the city with an outsider’s perspective. The subjects of her photographs were often other domestic helpers in Hong Kong, particularly those who had been abused or were in distress. She received the Magnum Foundation Fellowship for Human Right in 2015 and enrolled in a photography course at the Tisch School of Arts, New York University. Her aspiration is to be a photojournalist and to help people with her images.

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With the current heated discussions on migrants, refugees and human rights around the globe, it would be a suitable time to look back to the often overlooked community of migrants in Hong Kong. The series of events is planned with the hope to raise awareness and provide opportunities for new dialogues.