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CPCH hosting Hong Kong’s first One City One Book programme

The Centre for Popular Culture in the Humanities at The Education University of Hong Kong is proud to announce that Hong Kong’s first ever One City, One Book initiative will be hosted during the 2018/2019 academic year.

One City One Book is a community reading programme which aims to get as many people as possible in a city, to read and discuss a single book. A series of activities related to the chosen book, are held around the city over a concentrated period of time. These activities may include talks and panel discussions on the book and its themes, exhibitions, film screenings, school events, book discussions, author visit, cultural performances, library events, etc. The goals of the initiative are often to build a sense of community and promote literacy. The book chosen for the first ever One City One Book initiative in Hong Kong is The Arrival (2006), a wordless graphic novel by the Chinese Australian graphic novelist Shaun Tan.

More information will be announced soon at the One City One Book homepage: onecityonebook.hk. Should you have any inquiries, please do not hesitate to contact us at oncecityonebook@eduhk.hk. Stay tuned!

Thinking-with Bark: Activating a postdevelopmental logic in early childhood education

Thinking-with Bark: Activating a postdevelopmental logic in early childhood education

Mindy Blaise, Professor, Early Childhood Education, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia

15:30 – 17:00, 19th April 2018

B3-LP-04, Tai Po Campus EdUHK

 

This paper sets out to challenge the developmental logic that works hard to tame, simplify, and control young children’s learning. As a challenge to this kind of logic, I have been conducting a long term multisensory and affect-focused inquiry of children’s relations with place. Weekly I go walking with a group of children and their teachers to Stony Creek, located on the lands of the Kulin Nations people in Melbourne, Australia. By paying attention to children’s relations with Eucalyptus trees, we created the Bark Studio as a place for experimentations and provocations.

 

In the Bark Studio we have been wondering about bark movements and ask, “How does movement let knowing happen?” We are intrigued with this question because it challenges the idea that knowing presupposes what is to be known, or that knowing presupposes the subject.

By thinking with movement, movements of thought, and bark materiality, I show how bark movements put into motion the relational potential of the bark. Several encounters with bark, wind, and water will be explored. I will explore how teachers and young children are putting thinking into movement and movement into thinking and how this makes room for relational complexity. I argue that relational complexity activates a postdevelopmental logic that unleashes, complicates, and opens-up learning in early childhood education.

 

Professor Mindy Blaise’s interdisciplinary research involves bringing together the environmental humanities and early childhood education to generate postdevelopmental pedagogies for the Anthropocene. She provokes teachers to challenge human exceptionalism and ‘make room for the more’ to generate ethico-political practices for living well together in these uncertain times.

 

GRF/RAE Workshop by Professor Chris Berry

Date: 28th March 2018 (Wed)

Time: 15:30 – 17:00

Venue: D1-LP-06, Tai Po Campus, EdUHK

 

Abstract

 

Not sure what to submit to the RAE? What is impact, and how can Humanities and Social Sciences researchers achieve it? How do we write a research narrative? Want to improve your GRF chances? How are external reviewers chosen? What makes for an effective grant application? Should I apply again if I get 3.5? How important is having a Hong Kong dimension? Chris Berry has been on various RGC panels, including the GRF, since 2007. He has been through RAE exercises in Australia and the UK. He will offer his insights from these experiences and answer your questions.

 

Bio

 

Chris Berry is Professor of Film Studies at King’s College London. In the 1980s, he worked for China Film Import and Export Corporation in Beijing, and his academic research is grounded in work on Chinese-language cinemas and other Chinese-language screen-based media, as well as work from neighboring countries. Publications include: Cinema and the National: China on Screen (2006); Postsocialist Cinema in Post-Mao China: the Cultural Revolution after the Cultural Revolution (2004);Chinese Film Festivals: Sites of Translation (2017); Routledge Handbook of East Asian Popular Culture (2016); Public Space, Media Space (2013); Chinese Cinema, 4 vols, (2012); The New Chinese Documentary Film Movement: For the Public Record (2010); Electronic Elsewheres: Media, Technology, and Social Space (2010); Cultural Studies and Cultural Industries in Northeast Asia: What a Difference a Region Makes (2009); TV China (2008); Chinese Films in Focus II (2008); and Island on the Edge: Taiwan New Cinema and After (2005).

 

All are welcome and no registration is required. Please send any enquiries to Mr. Manni Cheung at 2948 7360 or via email cheungml@eduhk.hk.

Public Lecture: “Taiwanese-Language Films (Taiyupian): An Alternative Cinema of Poverty?” By Professor Chris Berry

Public Lecture: “Taiwanese-Language Films (Taiyupian): An Alternative Cinema of Poverty?”

Date: 26th March 2018 (Mon)

Time: 12:30 – 14:00

Venue: D2-LP-05, Tai Po Campus, EdUHK

 

Abstract

 

The cycle of over 1,000 low-budget, Taiwanese-language films made between the mid-1950s and early 1970s was neglected and forgotten for many years. By the time people became interested in reclaiming them as Taiwan’s heritage, only 200-plus survived. One reason for their low regard has been their low production quality. In this paper, I propose approaching Taiwanese-language films as an alternative “cinema of poverty.” Recently, Song Hwee Lim has adapted Jerzy Grotowski’s idea of a “theatre of poverty” to analyse Midi Zi’s films. But where Lim and Grotowski see poverty as encouraging a high modernist stripping down to the essentials of the medium, Taiwanese-language cinema is another kind of cinema of poverty. It is characterised by the adoption of methods designed to maximise audience appeal in the shortest production time possible and at a low budget. These methods include sensational plot twists, emotive acting, and an exuberant practice of what Lu Xun in the 1930s called “grabbism” (拿来主义) – borrowing music, plot and anything else that works from overseas to create a locally distinctive bricolage.

 

Bio

 

Chris Berry is Professor of Film Studies at King’s College London. In the 1980s, he worked for China Film Import and Export Corporation in Beijing, and his academic research is grounded in work on Chinese-language cinemas and other Chinese-language screen-based media, as well as work from neighboring countries. Publications include: Cinema and the National: China on Screen (2006); Postsocialist Cinema in Post-Mao China: the Cultural Revolution after the Cultural Revolution (2004);Chinese Film Festivals: Sites of Translation (2017); Routledge Handbook of East Asian Popular Culture (2016); Public Space, Media Space (2013); Chinese Cinema, 4 vols, (2012); The New Chinese Documentary Film Movement: For the Public Record (2010); Electronic Elsewheres: Media, Technology, and Social Space (2010); Cultural Studies and Cultural Industries in Northeast Asia: What a Difference a Region Makes (2009); TV China (2008); Chinese Films in Focus II (2008); and Island on the Edge: Taiwan New Cinema and After (2005).

 

All are welcome and no registration is required. Please send any enquiries to Mr. Manni Cheung at 2948 7360 or via email cheungml@eduhk.hk.

(Cancellation) “From Journey to the West on the way to Another World (is possible)” by Professor Chen Kuan-Hsing
[Event Cancelled]

We regret to inform you that the following seminar has been cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances. Please accept our apologies.

Date : 9 March 2018 (Friday)
Time : 3:30pm – 5:30pm
Venue : B3-LP-05, Tai Po Campus
Medium : English

 

Since the 19th Century, our modes of thought and knowledge, in Africa, Asia and Latin America, have been shaped by imperial and colonial encounters. For critical intellectuals in particular, the historical sources of thought (practices, institutions, worldviews/cosmologies, etc) have become untouchable. The desire to be “modern” has generated self-hatred, made us look down on our own peasant-centered family/clan histories and popular faith, as if these were superstitions to be abandoned and relegated into the garbage can of history. However, at the present conjuncture of global transformations, as Marx would have it, the ghosts have begun to resurface, becoming twilights of hope guiding us on our path of uncertainties. This presentation attempts to reclaim the past as systems of reference via “personal” trajectories of re/discovering ancestral stories contiguous with world history. Tang Sanzang 唐三藏 (602-664; Xuanzang 玄奘 or Chen Hui 陳禕), the main protagonist of Journey to the West 《西遊記》, who, according to Prof. Tan Chung 譚中, invented the term “India” and the term “China” was coined by an Indian monk, has turned out to be my ancestor. What I have done in the past 30 years or so is merely an extension of what he had decisively opened up. This “re/turn” is not a nostalgia (which is also legitimate) but a possibility to reground ourselves to imagine that “another world is possible.” This is one of the leftover tasks of intellectual work today.

Bio

Professor Chen is the founding chair of Taiwan’s Cultural Studies Association and founding member of the Association for Cultural Studies and Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Society (and its Consortium). He is a core member of the Taiwan: A Radical Quarterly in Social Studies, he has been a co-editor of the journal, Inter-Asia Cultural Studies: Movements (2000-) and Renjian Thought Review (mandarin Chinese; 2010-). A writer, editor, reporter, cultural organizer, curator, karaoke singer, and iPhone photographer, he is a Tibetan Buddhist.

 

All are welcome to join the seminar and no registration is required. Should you have any enquiries, please feel free to contact Mr. Manni Cheung at 2948 7360 or via email cheungml@eduhk.hk. For other information regarding Professor Chen’s visit at EdUHK during 6 – 10 March 2018, please contact Ms. Emily Mang at 2948 6142 or via email ewlmang@eduhk.hk.

 

We look forward to seeing you there!