What’s New

 

Modernism and Empathy: An International and Interdisciplinary Conference

Date: 15-16 June 2018

Venue: The Education University of Hong Kong

This is the inaugural conference of the Modernist Studies in Asia (MSIA) network. This network was established in 2017 to provide a regional hub for scholars of modernist studies within Asia. A central aim of the network is to facilitate a gathering of international modernist scholars on an annual basis and in a variety of Asian universities and contexts. Our first conference is jointly supported by the Department of Literature and Cultural Studies and the Centre for Popular Culture in the Humanities (CPCH) at the Education University of Hong Kong.

Please visit the conference site for further details

Thinking-with Bark: Activating a postdevelopmental logic in early childhood education

Thinking-with Bark: Activating a postdevelopmental logic in early childhood education

Mindy Blaise, Professor, Early Childhood Education, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia

15:30 – 17:00, 19th April 2018

B3-LP-04, Tai Po Campus EdUHK

 

This paper sets out to challenge the developmental logic that works hard to tame, simplify, and control young children’s learning. As a challenge to this kind of logic, I have been conducting a long term multisensory and affect-focused inquiry of children’s relations with place. Weekly I go walking with a group of children and their teachers to Stony Creek, located on the lands of the Kulin Nations people in Melbourne, Australia. By paying attention to children’s relations with Eucalyptus trees, we created the Bark Studio as a place for experimentations and provocations.

 

In the Bark Studio we have been wondering about bark movements and ask, “How does movement let knowing happen?” We are intrigued with this question because it challenges the idea that knowing presupposes what is to be known, or that knowing presupposes the subject.

By thinking with movement, movements of thought, and bark materiality, I show how bark movements put into motion the relational potential of the bark. Several encounters with bark, wind, and water will be explored. I will explore how teachers and young children are putting thinking into movement and movement into thinking and how this makes room for relational complexity. I argue that relational complexity activates a postdevelopmental logic that unleashes, complicates, and opens-up learning in early childhood education.

 

Professor Mindy Blaise’s interdisciplinary research involves bringing together the environmental humanities and early childhood education to generate postdevelopmental pedagogies for the Anthropocene. She provokes teachers to challenge human exceptionalism and ‘make room for the more’ to generate ethico-political practices for living well together in these uncertain times.

 

GRF/RAE Workshop by Professor Chris Berry

Date: 28th March 2018 (Wed)

Time: 15:30 – 17:00

Venue: D1-LP-06, Tai Po Campus, EdUHK

 

Abstract

 

Not sure what to submit to the RAE? What is impact, and how can Humanities and Social Sciences researchers achieve it? How do we write a research narrative? Want to improve your GRF chances? How are external reviewers chosen? What makes for an effective grant application? Should I apply again if I get 3.5? How important is having a Hong Kong dimension? Chris Berry has been on various RGC panels, including the GRF, since 2007. He has been through RAE exercises in Australia and the UK. He will offer his insights from these experiences and answer your questions.

 

Bio

 

Chris Berry is Professor of Film Studies at King’s College London. In the 1980s, he worked for China Film Import and Export Corporation in Beijing, and his academic research is grounded in work on Chinese-language cinemas and other Chinese-language screen-based media, as well as work from neighboring countries. Publications include: Cinema and the National: China on Screen (2006); Postsocialist Cinema in Post-Mao China: the Cultural Revolution after the Cultural Revolution (2004);Chinese Film Festivals: Sites of Translation (2017); Routledge Handbook of East Asian Popular Culture (2016); Public Space, Media Space (2013); Chinese Cinema, 4 vols, (2012); The New Chinese Documentary Film Movement: For the Public Record (2010); Electronic Elsewheres: Media, Technology, and Social Space (2010); Cultural Studies and Cultural Industries in Northeast Asia: What a Difference a Region Makes (2009); TV China (2008); Chinese Films in Focus II (2008); and Island on the Edge: Taiwan New Cinema and After (2005).

 

All are welcome and no registration is required. Please send any enquiries to Mr. Manni Cheung at 2948 7360 or via email cheungml@eduhk.hk.

Public Lecture: “Taiwanese-Language Films (Taiyupian): An Alternative Cinema of Poverty?” By Professor Chris Berry

Public Lecture: “Taiwanese-Language Films (Taiyupian): An Alternative Cinema of Poverty?”

Date: 26th March 2018 (Mon)

Time: 12:30 – 14:00

Venue: D2-LP-05, Tai Po Campus, EdUHK

 

Abstract

 

The cycle of over 1,000 low-budget, Taiwanese-language films made between the mid-1950s and early 1970s was neglected and forgotten for many years. By the time people became interested in reclaiming them as Taiwan’s heritage, only 200-plus survived. One reason for their low regard has been their low production quality. In this paper, I propose approaching Taiwanese-language films as an alternative “cinema of poverty.” Recently, Song Hwee Lim has adapted Jerzy Grotowski’s idea of a “theatre of poverty” to analyse Midi Zi’s films. But where Lim and Grotowski see poverty as encouraging a high modernist stripping down to the essentials of the medium, Taiwanese-language cinema is another kind of cinema of poverty. It is characterised by the adoption of methods designed to maximise audience appeal in the shortest production time possible and at a low budget. These methods include sensational plot twists, emotive acting, and an exuberant practice of what Lu Xun in the 1930s called “grabbism” (拿来主义) – borrowing music, plot and anything else that works from overseas to create a locally distinctive bricolage.

 

Bio

 

Chris Berry is Professor of Film Studies at King’s College London. In the 1980s, he worked for China Film Import and Export Corporation in Beijing, and his academic research is grounded in work on Chinese-language cinemas and other Chinese-language screen-based media, as well as work from neighboring countries. Publications include: Cinema and the National: China on Screen (2006); Postsocialist Cinema in Post-Mao China: the Cultural Revolution after the Cultural Revolution (2004);Chinese Film Festivals: Sites of Translation (2017); Routledge Handbook of East Asian Popular Culture (2016); Public Space, Media Space (2013); Chinese Cinema, 4 vols, (2012); The New Chinese Documentary Film Movement: For the Public Record (2010); Electronic Elsewheres: Media, Technology, and Social Space (2010); Cultural Studies and Cultural Industries in Northeast Asia: What a Difference a Region Makes (2009); TV China (2008); Chinese Films in Focus II (2008); and Island on the Edge: Taiwan New Cinema and After (2005).

 

All are welcome and no registration is required. Please send any enquiries to Mr. Manni Cheung at 2948 7360 or via email cheungml@eduhk.hk.

Symposium: Re-Thinking  Chinese Language  Film History

Re-Thinking Chinese Language Film History

A Symposium organized by the Centre for Popular Culture in the Humanities at The Education University of Hong Kong

Chinese-language cinema has a long history, almost as long as film itself. The “Re-thinking Chinese-Language Film History” symposium organized by the Centre for Popular Culture in the Humanities at The Education University of Hong Kong, revisits this topic with a wide range of presentations including Cold War era Chinese films, Hong Kong – China film co-productions and Eco-Cinema.

 

 

Date : 23 March 2018 (Friday)
Time : 09:45am – 5:30pm*
Venue : Block D2 & D3, Tai Po Campus, The Education University of Hong Kong
Medium : English

 

*Schedule break down

Panel 1(0945 – 11:45): D2-LP-08

Panel 2(13:45 – 15:15): D3-LP-07

Panel 3(15:30  – 17:30): D2-LP-09

 

Updated on: 22 Mar 2018

 

 

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